How to Deal with Emotional Abuse
If you are being abused it is not your fault. You are not alone. We’re here for you—always. So, you got in a fight with your partner. And you’re mad—like, really mad. In a healthy relationship, you’ll take some time to cool off and eventually move on or work through the argument together. This is totally normal. Because, guess what? People disagree all the time. 
There is a line, however, in which your run of the mill disagreement transitions to abuse. Abuse—sometimes known as domestic violence or intimate partner violence (IPV)—is consistent behaviors used to assert power or control over a partner in a relationship. 

For info, visit: www.crisistextline.org/get-help/emotional-abuse
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How to Deal with Self-Harm
We all need healthy ways to cope with the hard stuff. For some people, when depression and anxiety lead to a tornado of emotions, they turn to self-harm looking for a release. Self-harm and self-injury are any forms of hurting oneself on purpose. Usually, when people self-harm, they do not do so as a suicide attempt. Rather, they self-harm as a way to release painful emotions. 

For info, visit: www.crisistextline.org/get-help/self-harm
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How to Deal with Loneliness
We’ve all been there—you are not alone. If you are a human in this world, chances are you have felt left out from time to time. Maybe you did not land an invite to a party of the year.  Or, maybe your pals forgot to invite you to lunch. Or, maybe you just have yet to find the people who make you tick. Feeling lonely because you are isolated from time to time is not uncommon. For some people, though, the feeling of loneliness persists;

For info, visit: www.crisistextline.org/get-help/loneliness
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How to Deal with Sexual Abuse?
Sexual abuse is absolutely any form of undesired sexual behavior. Period. It’s everywhere and can happen to anyone. It’s in the high profile cases you hear about in the news and in the quiet unwanted sexual encounter with someone you thought you trusted that left you scared, hurt, confused, and maybe even ashamed to tell anyone. If you’ve experienced sexual abuse, you are not alone; someone in America is sexually assaulted every 92 seconds.

Sexual assault and sexual abuse can be disastrous for mental and physical health. Survivors have an increased risk of depression, anxiety, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and substance use disorders. The pros say people can experience the devastating mental health effects of sexual abuse weeks, months, and even years later. 

People may encounter sexual abuse in a variety of situations—with a stranger at a party, at your place of work, with a long-term romantic partner. Regardless of the situation, one thing is always true: it is never ever the victim’s fault.

Surviving sexual abuse is not a linear process. One day, you can wake up feeling totally fine. Then, BAM. You see or hear something that reminds you of the assault. That is how trauma works. Anytime, anywhere, out of nowhere—back to square one. And, that is the thing about surviving: over time, with the right help, you can unlock the tools you need to not only survive, but also to thrive. Because, you deserve love and compassion. Your body deserves to be safe. And, there are so many people (including us!) ready to help you make that happen.

For info, visit: www.crisistextline.org/sexualabuse
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How to Handle School Stress and Anxiety
Some people love school—when else is learning all day, every day going to be your whole job? For others, school can be a real challenge. And, with good reason: nearly 50 percent of students in grades four to 12 are bullied at school each month. Plus, pressure on test scores has created a high-stakes learning environment that makes it difficult for you to actually learn. On top of that, nearly 20 percent of high school students are juggling school and family responsibilities with a part-time job.

If you find school challenging, just the thought of getting on the bus every morning could result in crippling stress and anxiety. One study found that teens experience stress during the school year that outpaces the stress adults feel day-to-day. All of this stress interferes with your ability to do your job: learning and growing. 

For info, visit: www.crisistextline.org/school